Media

Dr Lily Bentley presents at CMS COP14 and gains feature in Australian Geographic magazine

May 2024

Dr Lily Bentley, a movement ecologist and Postdoctoral Research Fellow at UQ, recently attended the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) COP14 to share her work on migratory species - which was also featured in Australian Geographic

The 14th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS COP14) took place in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, from 12 to 17 February 2024. "As a scientist, it was fascinating to see the way that international conservation policies and priorities are discussed and agreed upon, and to consider how we can be strategic in our work to support decision-making in that space," Bentley says. 

"Presenting in a side-event coordinated by Birdlife International on marine flyways was particularly exciting, as in addition to presenting UQ research I was able to meet and speak with delegates from NGOs, UN bodies, and national governments, who want to collaborate to protect migratory species," she says. 

As for her Australian Geographic coverage, Bentley wrote on LinkedIn that she was "absolutely stoked" to have contributed to a magazine which she had "read and collected every edition" of as a child. 

Dr Lily Bentley presents at CMS COP14 in Samarkand, Uzbekistan.
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PhD student Chloe Dawson presents at International Association for Impact Assessment conference

May 2024

PhD student Chloe Dawson recently presented her talk, 'using a buffer-based approach to make global assessments on mining impacts' at the International Association for Impact Assessment conference in Dublin, Ireland. Her PhD research focuses on understanding where to source energy transition metals for climate change mitigation with reduced impacts on biodiversity. "The conference was a great opportunity to network and engage with the broader industry and academic community. It has already led to several post-conference meetings, and new friends who share a passion for conservation," Dawson says.

Left to right: Luis E. Sánchez, Sebastian Luckeneder, Will Stephen, Chloe Dawson, Laura Sonter, Aurora Torres, Ieuan Lamb, Stefan Giljum.

Photo credit: Laura Sonter, LinkedIn

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Well-being from nature exposure depends on socio-environmental contexts in Paraguay

May 2024

Postdoctoral research fellow Violeta Berdejo-Espinola has just published a paper with co-authors Professor Richard Fuller and Associate Professor Renee Zahnow in Nature Cities titled “Well-being from nature exposure depends on socio-environmental contexts in Paraguay”.

Notably, the researchers found that while in wealthier areas of Paraguay people are healthier in greener neighbourhoods, but interestingly, in the poorest communities, having plenty of nature around where a person lives is actually correlated with lower health and wellbeing. "This could be an important finding globally for how we provide and maintain nature spaces in the poorest areas of cities, including in Australia. Very few studies have ever included the very poorest neighbourhoods in a city – research has largely overlooked or excluded those people," says Berdejo-Espinola.

"The lessons are that we need to ensure green spaces in the most socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are high quality, well maintained, and have low risks of environmental hazards such as flood, fire and pestilence. This is deeply challenging, because there are structural economic forces restricting people’s choices about where to live," she says.

Read the paper here.

Image of informal settlements and the surrounding greenery taken in the study area, Asunción, Paraguay.

Photo credit: Violeta Berdejo-Espinola

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Dr Lily Bentley and Associate Professor Carissa Klein perform at the Brisbane Comedy Festival

May 2024

CBCSers Dr Lily Bentley and Associate Professor Carissa Klein performed at the Brisbane Comedy Festival last weekend as part of The Future Science Talks Comedy Edition.

Lily Bentley, a movement ecologist and Postdoctoral Research Fellow at UQ, told us “it was an amazing opportunity to chat to the public about conservation, and learn a lot about how to tell an entertaining story along the way!”

ARC Future Fellow and Deputy Director of CBCS, Carissa Klein, also shared a similar sentiment stating “it was a great way to get an important conservation message out to an audience I would not normally reach”.

Congratulations to Lily and Carissa, and thank you so much to our CBCS community who showed up to support the duo.

Dr Lily Bentley performing at the Brisbane Comedy Festival
Dr Lily Bentley performing at the Brisbane Comedy Festival.

Photo credit: David Crisante from Future Science Talks

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Nature positive must not become greenwashing

September 2023

Professor Martine Maron has led a paper with co-authors Drs Megan Evans and Sophus zu Ermgassen and others in Nature Ecology and Evolution titled “’Nature positive’ must incorporate, not undermine, the mitigation hierarchy”.

The authors argue that for the hot topic of nature positive to succeed as the lodestar for international action on biodiversity conservation, it must build on lessons learned from the application of the mitigation hierarchy – or risk becoming mere greenwash.

Read the paper here, a UQ News story about the research here, and a Conversation piece here.

Image: DaYsO/Unsplash

Tatsuya Amano on the costs of being a non-native English speaker in science

September 2023